Analyse The Circumstances That Led To Tashkent Agreement In 1966 Mrunal

Although considered a great diplomatic success, Tashkent`s declaration could not limit the possibility of a future conflict between India and Pakistan. This possibility continues to this day. On 10 January 1966, India and Pakistan signed the Tashkent Declaration to establish peace in the wake of the 1965 Indo-Pakistan War. The declaration only ended the hostilities between India and Pakistan, but left the issue of Kashmir between the two, and neither side has been able to reach an agreement to date. The first Indo-Pakistan War, known as the First Kashmir War (October 22, 1947-January 5, 1949), took place shortly after the independence of India and Pakistan. A ceasefire agreement has led to the establishment of the Line of Control (LOC) as the de facto border between India and Pakistan in Kashmir. II The Indian Prime Minister and the President of Pakistan agreed that all armed personnel from both countries would be withdrawn by 25 February 1966 from their pre-August 5, 1965 positions, and both sides would abide by ceasefire conditions. In this agreement, Pakistan wanted to reopen the issue of India`s accession to jammus and cashmere countries. But India never let it happen. Although India is on the winning side, it could have solved the Kashmir problem in a lasting way. India also succumbed to pressure from the USSR. This agreement was negotiated by the USSR and signed between India and Pakistan in Tashkent. Shastri died mysteriously in Tashkent after signing the agreement.

It was reported that he had died of a heart attack, but there were conspiracy theories about his death that speculated that he was murdered. Mediation took place through the USSR, during which a meeting was held in Tashkent from 4 to 10 January 1966 to establish a more lasting peace between India and Pakistan. The meeting took place between Indian Prime Minister Lal Bahadur Shastri, Pakistani President Muhammad Ayub Khan, moderated by Soviet Prime Minister Alexei Kosygin. The Tashkent Declaration was a peace agreement between India and Pakistan to resolve the Pakistani Indopa war of 1965 (August 5, 1965 to September 23, 1965). It was signed in Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan, which in turn was part of one of the republics of the USSR. The main objective was to restore economic and diplomatic relations in the countries concerned, to stay away from the internal and external affairs of the other and to work towards the advancement of bilateral relations. VII The Indian Prime Minister and the President of Pakistan agreed that they would instruct their respective authorities on the repatriation of prisoners of war. The Tashkent Declaration was a peace agreement between India and Pakistan, signed on 10 January 1966, which resolved the 1965 Indo-Pakistan war. Peace was achieved on 23 September by the intervention of the external powers that pushed the two nations to the truce, lest the conflict intensify and attract other powers. [1] VIII The Indian Prime Minister and the President of Pakistan agreed that the parties would continue to discuss issues related to refugee issues and illegal deportations/immigration.